NOVEMBER FIFTH NOT JUST THE GUN POWDER PLOT!

I come from an extensive family but November is the only month that there was just one birthday to celebrate. My Nana was born November 5th 1905 in Connah’s Quay, the eldest of a million children (I exaggerate but when I was a child I could not keep up with who was who). Aunties and uncles that were actually my cousins, mum had uncles younger than her and aunties who were similar ages.

We celebrated Nana’s birthday every year with a party and fireworks and a huge great bonfire… it was a long time before I realised that in fact when dad had said Bonfire Night was for Nana it was actually to do with a plot to blow up the Houses of Parliament!

Happy Birthday Nana – Guy Fawkes? Never heard of him!

NOVEMBER EVENTS…29 OCT JEFFREY ARCHER, 30 OCT MARKUS ZUSAK, 13 NOV CRIME & WINE, 14 NOV BARBARA KINGSOLVER, 19 NOV DAN SNOW, 20 NOV KATE HUMBLE, 26 NOV PRUE LEITH contact the shop for tickets and further details.

 

REVIEWS

GEORGE SAUNDERS – FOX 8

Man-Booker prize winner (Lincoln in the Bardo) George Saunders has managed to write another suburb novel.  This time an exquisitely illustrated and moral tale about the impact human consumerism is having on the natural world.  Fox 8 is a clever fox who, by listening to children’s stories, has learned to speak “yuman” and realises the “danjur” his pack is facing when another shopping centre is being built that will cut off their food supply.  Impactful, funny and very powerful, Fox 8’s voice is poetic and truthful an absolutely stunning book.

 

RACHEL ABBOTT – AND SO IT BEGINS

Rachel will be joining us on our Crime and Wine evening on 14 Nov, (with Mary Torjussen). ‘And So It Begins’ is a brutally addictive psychological thriller with the story focussing on the relationship between widower Mark his partner Evie and sister Cleo.  Mark is found dead and Evie admits to killing him…duh duh duh!

 

DAVID ALMOND – WAR IS OVER

Very apt that I review this book by much loved author David Almond which marks the centenary year of the end of the First World War.  John’s father is fighting in the trenches, while his mother is employed in an ammunitions factory based in the north. A chance encounter with a German boy John begins to question the futility and ugliness that comes with conflict. When issues are discussed through the eyes of a child it always adds a different dimension.