All About Heswall

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Heswall is located in the North-West of the UK, on the west of the Wirral Peninsula, between Wales and Liverpool.

Bounded to the south by Cheshire, Heswall is part of the Borough of Wirral and is ideally placed for access to North Wales, the sea, and the cities of Liverpool and Chester, which are only 30 minutes away by car. Heswall has good bus and rail links and it’s closest major town, Birkenhead, is just 15 minutes away by car.

It is a thriving community of approximately 9,000 residents and 300 businesses and is one of the UK’s most sought-after residential areas. There are two main parts to Heswall – the busy, bustling “top” village with a wide variety of shops and numerous excellent restaurants, and the quieter and quaint lower village, which is protected by a conservation order.

The seeds of Heswall were sown when the Merchant Princes set up houses on the Wirral banks of the River Dee, initially as holiday retreats because of the spectacular views of Wales, wonderful scenery and invigorating fresh air.Heswall is a small town located in the North-West of the United Kingdom, on the west of the Wirral Peninsula, between Wales and Liverpool. It is a thriving community of approximately 9,000 residents and 300 businesses and is one of the UK’s most sought-after residential areas.

Situated close to the River Dee, it extends from the estuary shoreline inland towards greenbelt land, rising to 350 feet, making it the highest part of the Wirral peninsula. It enjoys a moderate climate, with higher than average sunshine and lower than average rainfall. Many areas, especially in lower Heswall command magnificent views of the Welsh hills, particularly beautiful at sunset. Bounded to the south by Cheshire, Heswall is part of the Borough of Wirral and is ideally placed for access to North Wales, the sea, and the cities of Liverpool and Chester, which are only 30 minutes away by car. The closest major town, Birkenhead is just 15 minutes away. Heswall has good public transport links, with a bus station in the town centre and a train station at Heswall Hills.

There is a tradition of a high standard of education in the area. Some of the country’s best performing schools, both primary and secondary, are located either in – or within 5 milesheswall_then of – Heswall and there are Universities within easy reach.

There are two main parts to Heswall – the busy, bustling “top” village with a wide variety of excellent shops and supermarkets, first-class businesses, and an almost infinite choice of restaurants (conveniently located in a simple T-shape of roads, formed by Telegraph Road and Pensby Road) – and the quieter and quaint lower village, where you can still find a pub, post office, church, chemist, butchers, ladies & gents hairdressers, tea-shop, antique shop, greengrocers, off-licence, newsagents and a garage, all within a short stretch of a single road. The original, lower village is protected by a conservation order and is characterised by the abundance of attractive local sandstone used in the construction of many of its buildings.

Heswall is a thriving community and a friendly and stimulating place to live. Though not immediately obvious to the passing visitor, there are large expanses of picturesque open land where you can walk, enjoy wonderful views and take in the fresh air: Heswall Dales, The Beacons, Whitfield Common, The Puddydale and the Wirral Way which follows the route of the old West Kirby to Hooton railway line and which can be enjoyed on foot, by bike or on horseback.

Wirral Borough Council provides a spacious Library with lending and reference material, talking books, free public access to computers, computer-based Learn Direct courses, exhibition room and Council One-Stop Advice Shop. Also provided are Children’s Story Times, special summer activities and an adult reading group. More recent innovations have included a Cancer Information area and Teenage Corner.

Adjacent to the Library is Heswall Hall, a multi-purpose centre with stage suitable for concerts, meetings, film shows, exhibitions, plays etc. Two amateur theatrical groups that regularly appear at the hall are The Riverside Players and The Woolgatherers (whose strange name is due to the fact that they used to raise money for wool to knit comforts for the armed forces during WWII). Another hall used by the many local groups, societies and hobbyists, and available for hire, is nearby Alexander Hall which was donated by the Alexander family in the 1960′s.

There is also a Citizen’s Advice Bureau located close by, in Rocky Lane, and the area has over a dozen churches, including C of E, Catholic and Methodist. Although Heswall does not have its own public Recreation Centre, there are Centres with excellent facilities, within a short distance either side of Heswall at both West Kirby and Neston.

Famous Heswall sons include cricketer Ian Botham, the late Disc Jockey John Peel and newscaster Fiona Bruce. Walking around Heswall, you may well catch a glimpse of a famous celebrity or two – usually a football player, local actor, or even one of the world’s most famous multi-millionaire pop personalities!